QRP Rig Comparison , FT817 / X108G / X5105 / mcHF RS-918

QRP Rig Comparison , FT817 / X108G / X5105 / mcHF RS-918

Here is a video explaining the basic comparisons to each one of these radios. You may or may not have seen all of these HF radios, and a video of each one can be seen on my channel. If you are familiar with each one of these radios, and you are debating which one to get, then this video will give you a general idea as to which one may best fit your needs. 



Video Here:




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=md9-wjmYvO0

QRP Rig Comparison FT817, QRP Rig Comparison mcHF, QRP Rig Comparison mcHF RS-918, QRP Rig Comparison mcHF X5105,

6 comments:

  1. Anonymous17:57

    I got an X5105 today, my first HF transceiver (have only done some DMR before). From your's and others reviews I figured it would be the best value with the ATU built in. Thanks for your very informative videos

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  2. Anonymous17:57

    The FT-817 operates from 70cm to 160M. The 70cm and 2M bands makes it the hands down winner. It's a complete ham shack in one box. For a QRP portable that feature alone is a game changer. The LDG auto tuner for the FT-817 is cheap, battery operated, and is tiny, which answers that objection. If I was going to carry just one radio into the woods, the Yaesu will be it.

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  3. Anonymous17:57

    I love my 817. The fact that it covers HF, 6m, 2m, and 70cm makes it a winner. As a bonus it also covers the FM broadcast band for RX. If you need more than 5 watts there are amps you can get for QRP radios. Sadly the display on my 817 is starting to fail. So I will have to send my 817 to Yaesu again for repair. I might also poke around ebay for a display or cheap parts radio.

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  4. Anonymous17:58

    I've been an avid backpacker and utilized QRP operation. As a backpacker weight and size are extremely important. My first QRP was a home brew back in 1972. 2 watt XTAL CW transmitter and direct conversion receiver. With headphones the receiver pulled only 45 ma at 12 volts. And this was important as you listen much more than transmit and at 45 ma you had many hours of listening time. Later I up graded to the heath kit HW-7 then the HW-9. Those rigs had more bands but was only CW. However, the receivers were still low in current draw. Fast forward I got the FT-817 when it first came out and used it on a number of trips in Colorado. Having 2 meter and 432 mhz SSB was a new and enjoyable mode as I did operate at 14,000 ft mountain peaks in Colorado but the draw back on the FT-817 and the other rigs also have the same draw back is the current draw during receive is 300 ma to 600 ma so this reduces your listening time by a factor of 10 over the simpler CW direct conversion QRP rigs and this needs to be taken into consideration when choosing the batteries. Today you can get solar panels that are light and flexible which can be hung from your pack and charge your batteries during your hiking hours but you need a good size battery as you will be operating several hours at night. You will need at least 5 amp hours. I found the batteries that could fit into the FT-817 ran out too soon so I was back to using separate battery packs.

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  5. Anonymous17:59

    I'm a new ham and I'm interested in QRP. I spend quite a bit of time in the mountains and rural areas where portable would be fun. I've been looking at the Yaesu 817, however a few people have tried to talk me out of QRP being a new ham. Their standpoint is the low power and other hams not wanting to come back to the weak signals will just frustrate me. I really want to enjoy ham radio when I'm camping and out where I can't take a bunch of equipment to support a full power setup. Should I scrap QRP for now or continue to find a lightweight setup to pack into camp? Garrett - K0RGH

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  6. Anonymous17:59

    Thanks for the overview of all these rigs. Well done! I wish you had an Elecraft KX2 to compare along with them, even though it would be a few hundred $ more. One of my concerns/interests is the quality of the receiver in all of these. The sensitivity, noise floor, actual filtering performance are all qualities that matter when operating and whether it is enjoyable or difficult to use. Pulling out weak signals when using portable (and often marginal) antennas in the field can make a big difference in working stations or even listening to SW broadcasts, etc. Thanks again for all your work on your videos. You are providing a valuable service to the ham community. Charlie K0CKH

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